COVID-19: Legal Aid BC now takes phone-only applications. Your questions answered.

Trouble logging in

Creating an account is quick and easy:

  1. On the Dialogue Tool home page, under Create an account, click Register. The Register page appears.
  2. In the text boxes, enter your First name, Last name, and Email and click Register. A message appears at the top of the page, confirming the email address to which MyLawBC has sent a welcome email.
  3. Check your email. Click Set your password. The Set Password screen appears.
  4. In the text boxes, enter, then repeat your password. Click Set new password.

Your password must contain:

  • eight characters,
  • one uppercase letter,
  • one lowercase letter,
  • one number, and
  • one of the following characters: ! @ # $ % ^ *

Example: myP4ssword!

You can now log in using your email and the password you set up.

After you answer the initial set of questions, MyLawBC will prompt your spouse to create an account and do the same.

  1. From the Dialogue Tool home page, under Returning users, click Log in. The Login page appears.
  2. Under the text boxes, click Forgot password? The Forgot Password page appears.
  3. Enter your email in the text box and click Request a password reset. A confirmation message appears at the top of the page, letting you know MyLawBC has emailed you.
  4. Check your email. Click Set up a new password. The Set Password page appears.
  5. In the text boxes, enter and repeat your password. Click Set new password.

Your password must contain:

  • eight characters,
  • one uppercase letter,
  • one lowercase letter,
  • one number, and
  • one of the following characters: ! @ # $ % ^ *

Example: myP4ssword!

You can now log in using your email and the password you set up.

A case ID is a unique number that MyLawBC assigns to your separation agreement. The number won't mean much to you. But it's how we find your separation agreement in our system if you have any issues with the Dialogue Tool and need us to troubleshoot.

  1. Log in to the Dialogue Tool.
  2. In the top right-hand corner, you'll see the Profile icon (a head with a circle around it). Click the icon. A drop-down menu appears.
  3. Click Cases. The My Cases page appears, which lists your Case ID.

Working with your spouse

Yes. The Dialogue Tool requires that you and your spouse can communicate and work together. Once you both complete the intake questions, you can see each other's answers. This allows you to see how close together your responses are and understand what each of your priorities are.

Your spouse may not have had the time to respond to your invitation. Or perhaps they need to take some time to think.

MyLawBC will send your spouse a reminder every week for three weeks after you invite them to join you on the Dialogue Tool. If they haven't responded yet, you can also try contacting your spouse directly.

At the end of the third week, if your spouse hasn't joined, MyLawBC will unlock your separation agreement. You can continue working on the Dialogue Tool by yourself. Use the Dialogue Tool to set out what you think will work for your family. Your spouse can join at any time and you can continue working on your agreement together.

If your spouse never joins, you can share your draft agreement with a lawyer and get their advice. Setting out your ideas beforehand will save you time and money. You can then use your draft as the basis for court orders.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side to find out where to get legal help. And see MyLawBC's Get family orders pathway for help with the court process.

Your spouse may not be participating for many reasons. They may have questions about the process, feel they don't have the time, or maybe just aren't motivated. Try talking to your spouse to see why they aren't participating. Once you know, you can work together to find a solution.

If your spouse is unwilling to participate, you can continue working on the Dialogue Tool by yourself. Email us at mylawbc@legalaid.bc.ca to let us know you want to work on your agreement by yourself. Include your case ID in your email.

You can then use the Dialogue Tool to set out what you think will work for your family. You can share your draft agreement with a lawyer and get their advice. Setting out your ideas beforehand will save you time and money. You can then use your draft as the basis for court orders.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side to find out where to get legal help. And see MyLawBC's Get family orders pathway for help with the court process.

Yes. After you invite your spouse to join you on the Dialogue Tool, MyLawBC will send your spouse a reminder every week for three weeks. At the end of the third week, if your spouse hasn't joined, MyLawBC will unlock your separation agreement. You can continue working on the Dialogue Tool by yourself.

Use the Dialogue Tool to set out what you think will work for your family. Your spouse can join at any time and you can continue working on your agreement together.

If your spouse never joins, you can share your draft agreement with a lawyer and get their advice. Setting out your ideas beforehand will save you time and money. You can then use your draft as the basis for court orders.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side to find out where to get legal help. And see MyLawBC's Get family orders pathway for help with the court process.

Get help

Sometimes no matter what you try when you're working on your family law matters, nothing seems to work. This is normal. Separation is emotional and difficult. There are professionals who are specially trained to help you resolve your issues and reach an agreement. Free help is available to those who qualify.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side to find detailed information about the dispute resolution professionals who can help you.

Use the Dialogue Tool for the issues you can agree on

Even if you can't agree on everything, use the Dialogue Tool to set out an agreement for the issues you do agree on.

Get court orders for the issues you can't agree on

If you can't reach an agreement on some or all of the issues, you need to get court orders. See MyLawBC's Get family orders pathway for help with the court process.

The law encourages and supports using agreements to resolve family law issues. Courts respect fair agreements. You don't need a lawyer to make a separation agreement.

However, agreements can cover complicated areas of law. If you're unsure about any part of your agreement, get legal advice. An agreement that's fair to both you and your spouse will last. It's what's in everyone's best interests.

It’s also a very good idea to have a lawyer look at your agreement before you sign it.

You each need to have your own lawyer look at your agreement. Lawyers aren't allowed to act for both people in a separation or divorce. That would be a conflict of interest.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side for information on where to get legal help.


Privacy and security

Protecting your personal information is our top priority. MyLawBC's Dialogue Tool can only work because of the trust you place in us. We designed the Dialogue Tool so that your personal information is secure.

We keep all the information you give us on secure servers in Canada. These servers follow the ISO 27001 security standard to make sure your information is safe.

For more information on how we store and use your information, see our Privacy Policy.

Yes. The Dialogue Tool requires that you and your spouse can communicate and work together. Once you both complete the intake questions, you can see each other's answers. This allows you to see how close together your responses are and understand what each of your priorities are.


Using the Dialogue Tool

Our Dialogue Tool Guide gives you an overview of how to use the Dialogue Tool. It has a number of tips and tricks that make using the Dialogue Tool easier. Click Dialogue Tool Guide on the right-hand side.

In general, you shouldn't need to change the answers you provided in the intake section. These are your initial ideas only. They're meant to be a starting point for your discussions with your spouse. But, if you want to change your answers, email mylawbc@legalaid.bc.ca. We can adjust them for you. Include your case ID in the email.

Yes. The Dialogue Tool requires that you and your spouse can communicate and work together. Once you both complete the intake questions, you can see each other’s answers. This allows you to see how close together your responses are and understand what each of your priorities are.

After you finish answering questions in the intake portion of the Dialogue Tool, MyLawBC asks you to provide your spouse's email. This is so that we can send them an invitation to create an account. If they don’t get this email, please have them check their spam folder first. If they still don’t see it, email mylawbc@legalaid.bc.ca. Include your case ID and your spouse’s email address in the email.

Yes. MyLawBC has an Alerts page that will show a summary of all changes to the separation agreement. Click on the bell icon at the top of the page to access the Alerts page. If there are new changes since you last logged in, the bell will have a red dot.

Any updated sections are also marked with yellow dots. Once you go to that section, the dot disappears.

If you're both in the Dialogue Tool at the same time, working in the same section, the yellow dot appears briefly. You can see the text your spouse enters into the clauses as they're typing.

Once you both agree to 100% of the issues, your agreement is locked. Neither of you can make any further changes.

You can see a summary of all the changes to your separation agreement on the Alerts page. Click the bell icon at the top of the page to access the Alerts page. If there are new changes since you last logged in, the bell will have a red dot. As this is just a summary of the changes, you may find it useful to note the changes in the Chat areas at the bottom of each page. This creates a record of your changes for future reference. It also helps your spouse to know what's changed.

Once both you and your spouse agree to every clause in your agreement, MyLawBC locks the agreement. No further changes can be made.

We can reopen your agreement if you want to revisit it and make changes. Email us at mylawbc@legalaid.bc.ca to ask us to reopen your agreement. Include your case ID in the email.

See our sample agreement, which was created with the Dialogue Tool. You can use this for your reference. Remember, every separation agreement is different; each agreement is tailored to your situation.

Help making important decisions is available. In the sidebar of each section of the Dialogue Tool, there's information that will help you. For example, you'll see links to information about child support and parenting time in the Children section. And there's a calculator to help you calculate child support amounts.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side of this page to find out:

  • who can help you and your spouse work together, or
  • where to get legal help.

The Family Law in BC website has detailed information about family law that you may find helpful.


About the Dialogue Tool

MyLawBC's Dialogue Tool helps you and your spouse work together on a separation agreement. The tool walks you through the process step by step.

First, you answer a series of questions. This is where you set out the facts of your situation. You also set out your initial ideas for workable arrangements for your family. Once you finish answering these questions, you invite your spouse to do the same.

Once your spouse answers all the questions, you can see each other's answers. The Dialogue Tool provides you with a template separation agreement based on both of your answers.

The Dialogue Tool gives you the space, resources, and support you need to work together to complete the agreement. Once you're both satisfied with the agreement and agree on all the issues, you can download and print your agreement. Once you both sign the agreement, it's legally binding.

Learn more about how the Dialogue Tool works in our Dialogue Tool Guide. Click Dialogue Tool Guide on the right-hand side.

The law encourages and supports using agreements to resolve family law issues. Courts respect fair agreements. You don't need a lawyer to make a separation agreement.

However, agreements can cover complicated areas of law. If you're unsure about any part of your agreement, get legal advice. An agreement that's fair to both you and your spouse will last. It's what's in everyone's best interests.

It’s also a very good idea to have a lawyer look at your agreement before you sign it.

You each need to have your own lawyer look at your agreement. Lawyers aren't allowed to act for both people in a separation or divorce. That would be a conflict of interest.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side for information on where to get legal help.

There's a general legal rule that says if you're trying to reach a settlement with someone else in a legal dispute that your communications can't be used against you in court. This rule is called settlement privilege. Any communications that can't be used as evidence in court under this rule are privileged (can't be used against you in court).

For more information about how settlement privilege works, see Can my spouse use our settlement discussions against me in court? on the Family Law in BC website.