Dialogue Tool

Click a question to get started.

Yes. The Dialogue Tool requires that you and your spouse can communicate and work together. Once you both complete the intake questions, you can see each other's answers. This allows you to see how close together your responses are and understand what each of your priorities are.

Your spouse may not have had the time to respond to your invitation. Or perhaps they need to take some time to think.

MyLawBC will send your spouse a reminder every week for three weeks after you invite them to join you on the Dialogue Tool. If they haven't responded yet, you can also try contacting your spouse directly.

At the end of the third week, if your spouse hasn't joined, MyLawBC will unlock your separation agreement. You can continue working on the Dialogue Tool by yourself. Use the Dialogue Tool to set out what you think will work for your family. Your spouse can join at any time and you can continue working on your agreement together.

If your spouse never joins, you can share your draft agreement with a lawyer and get their advice. Setting out your ideas beforehand will save you time and money. You can then use your draft as the basis for court orders.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side to find out where to get legal help. And see MyLawBC's Get family orders pathway for help with the court process.

Your spouse may not be participating for many reasons. They may have questions about the process, feel they don't have the time, or maybe just aren't motivated. Try talking to your spouse to see why they aren't participating. Once you know, you can work together to find a solution.

If your spouse is unwilling to participate, you can continue working on the Dialogue Tool by yourself. Email us at mylawbc.lss.bc.ca to let us know you want to work on your agreement by yourself. Include your case ID in your email.

You can then use the Dialogue Tool to set out what you think will work for your family. You can share your draft agreement with a lawyer and get their advice. Setting out your ideas beforehand will save you time and money. You can then use your draft as the basis for court orders.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side to find out where to get legal help. And see MyLawBC's Get family orders pathway for help with the court process.

Yes. After you invite your spouse to join you on the Dialogue Tool, MyLawBC will send your spouse a reminder every week for three weeks. At the end of the third week, if your spouse hasn't joined, MyLawBC will unlock your separation agreement. You can continue working on the Dialogue Tool by yourself.

Use the Dialogue Tool to set out what you think will work for your family. Your spouse can join at any time and you can continue working on your agreement together.

If your spouse never joins, you can share your draft agreement with a lawyer and get their advice. Setting out your ideas beforehand will save you time and money. You can then use your draft as the basis for court orders.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side to find out where to get legal help. And see MyLawBC's Get family orders pathway for help with the court process.

Get help

Sometimes no matter what you try when you're working on your family law matters, nothing seems to work. This is normal. Separation is emotional and difficult. There are professionals who are specially trained to help you resolve your issues and reach an agreement. Free help is available to those who qualify.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side to find detailed information about the dispute resolution professionals who can help you.

Use the Dialogue Tool for the issues you can agree on

Even if you can't agree on everything, use the Dialogue Tool to set out an agreement for the issues you do agree on.

Get court orders for the issues you can't agree on

If you can't reach an agreement on some or all of the issues, you need to get court orders. See MyLawBC's Get family orders pathway for help with the court process.

The law encourages and supports using agreements to resolve family law issues. Courts respect fair agreements. You don't need a lawyer to make a separation agreement.

However, agreements can cover complicated areas of law. If you're unsure about any part of your agreement, get legal advice. An agreement that's fair to both you and your spouse will last. It's what's in everyone's best interests.

It’s also a very good idea to have a lawyer look at your agreement before you sign it.

You each need to have your own lawyer look at your agreement. Lawyers aren't allowed to act for both people in a separation or divorce. That would be a conflict of interest.

Click Get help with your agreement on the right-hand side for information on where to get legal help.